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novel

The Quick Way to Write a Book

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The Quick Way to Write a Book

Yes you read that correctly. Because there are obviously 'non-quick' ways to write a book. One of the best ways to drag out the writing process is to let the book go cold. Think of this like a kidnapping, the first twenty-four hours of a kidnapping are crucial. Or in the case of the novel you're trying to write, the first 12 months are key. 

Let's get down to it. You want to write a book. You even have an idea. Let's walk through it.

Month 1: Plan, plan, plan. This applies to you whether you're a outliner or not. Try to plan out the ending. You make the writing go by much quicker if you know where its all going.

Month 2: Write, write, write. One of the best ways to get a running start with your novel is National Novel Writing Month, or NaNoWrMo. The goal is to write 50,000 words during the month of November. Not everyone can plan this out so November falls when they are ready to write. But consider doing it. The camaraderie is beyond compare. Suddenly, 1,667 words per day doesn't seem so great. Please don't worry if the whole draft feels like word vomit. 

Month 3: Keep Writing. The entire book won't get finished in one month. Trust me. Finish up. If you finish early, take some time off.

Month 4: Breathe. This may seem counterintuitive to being "quick." But it is essential to recenter yourself on the story. Taking a step back helps you write better.

Month 5: Revise. Large scale edits at this point. Bottom of the pyramid, narration and character development. Make sure your first chapter reflects your last chapter. Make the story come full circle.

Month 6:  Revise plot and story structure. This is one of the most important parts, I feel, of the revision process. Play close attention to plot holes and overblown metaphors, don't let anything detract from your story.

Month 7-8: Send to beta-readers. Find people who are not your friends or family, hopefully other writers that can offer you sincere feedback on your novel.

Month 9: Implement beta readers edits.

Month 10: Edit, edit, edit. Think the top of the pyramid. Grammar, punctuation, spelling. Work hard on this. Polish to a T. If necessary, hire a professional editor.

Month 11-12: Work on query letters. Send to agents. 

Look there it is! The Quick Way to Write a Book. One thing to remember is that 'quick' is relative. You cannot rush the process unless you are an author with a large team behind them, working on edits, building your online platform, etc. Relax in the everyday work.

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How I Make Writing Work as a Mother

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How I Make Writing Work as a Mother

Writing is hard work. You wouldn't think it but those pesky little letters can be tricky to form into the right order. Then enter children or even one singular child and it becomes that much more difficult.

Lets start with some introductory remarks. At this point in life (because life is crazy and I need to add a disclaimer), I have one child, an almost five year old daughter with a borderline unhealthy obsession with owls. She's a fantastic kid who is (almost) always helpful and does a decent job of cleaning up her toys when I tell her to.

But let's face it, she's still a young child who enjoys having mommy/daughter time and has needs (thrice daily feedings, naps, play, doctors appointments). Its incredibly difficult to work through all the interruptions and still come out with a few sentences that actually make sense.

I've learned a few tricks along the way, even though its still difficult to juggle a family and writing the next great American novel (I'm not saying that's what I'm producing). 

First off, get up early. Even just thirty minutes of uninterrupted writing at the beginning of the day can produce fantastic results. Early morning writing, takes getting used to but because you haven't used up any of your stores of discipline you are much more apt to actually write. So often my only writing time is at the start of the day, before husband and daughter are up with demands.

Remember the saying "nap when the baby naps." Its fantastic advice. Just substitute writing for the nap. Children are napping, take thirty minutes and write. I'll even sneak in some writing when my daughter watches her allotted 1 hour of tv a day. Much of the drafting for The Clouds Aren't White was done on this model. 

Lastly, make writing apart of your schedule. We all schedule cleaning and laundry and doctors appointments and grocery store trips. Schedule writing into your day. Don't say "if I have the time." Find the time. Writing doesn't have to be done every day. But it should be done, at the very least 3 times a week. Even if that's only ten minutes a day. This keeps your novel fresh in your mind.

There's no magic formula for finding writing time. What I've learned over the last three years, is to tailor writing to fit your lifestyle. If you have an hour during sports practice, bring notes or your laptop. Get creative. It is possible to write with children.

Cheers,

Rachael

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Win A Copy of The Clouds Aren't White

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Win A Copy of The Clouds Aren't White

It's giveaway time! To celebrate the release of my new book, The Clouds Aren't White, I am teaming up with Courtney Jacobs Photography to offer a wonderful giveaway. There are two prizes available, the first prize is a signed copy of my novel as well as a mini photoshoot. The second prize will be a signed copy of the novel. 

In order to enter, please like both my facebook page (Author Rachael Wright) and Courtney Jacobs Photography, like the contest post, and add a comment to be entered for the photoshoot. Tell us about a woman in your life who deserves it. 

Good luck! The contest will run Feb 1st till Feb 5th and the winners will be notified on Feb 6th. Only comment on the post, to be entered for the photoshoot, if you are a Western Colorado or Eastern Utah resident. 

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The Clouds Aren't White-Behind the Scenes

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The Clouds Aren't White-Behind the Scenes

The Clouds Aren't White (hereinafter referred to as-TCAW) is, at its heart, a story about love. In my introductory blog post I wrote how the story came about as just an idea about how a person would live life after losing their spouse. TCAW is a very special story because of (not just the main character-Emmeline) Sophie, the five year old, daughter. She is what drives Emmeline forward, keeps her mind on task, and comes to symbolize life.

As a mother to a young daughter myself, I adored writing Sophie. She has spunk and a little bit of drama. What I love most, though, is that she isn't the 'mini-me' to her mother. My own daughter is light-years different than I, an idea I wanted to convey throughout the novel. 

The second strong driver in TCAW is the secondary setting of the story, the Isle of Skye in Scotland. The town of Portree, where Emmeline and Sophie move, is a small town which triples in the late spring and summer months from tourists. While the museum where Emmeline works is a product of my imagination, the scenery and the harsh weather are all quite true. 

The Clouds Aren't White was a thrill to write. There were many moments while penning scenes that I started crying and I hope that the book inspires such emotion in my readers. 

If you haven't yet ordered your copy of The Clouds Aren't White, you can purchase the Ebook on Amazon here or you can order the paperback on CreateSpace here.

Cheers,

Rachael

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A Short Introduction

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A Short Introduction

Welcome to the Website! Thank you so much for stopping by. Especially for clicking here, on the blog. 

Let me introduce myself. 

I am a Colorado native, currently living in and around Denver. Writing has always been a passion of mine and publishing a novel one of my biggest dreams. I am married to a wonderful, hard working, and very supportive husband (who smiles when I lock myself in a room to work) and mother to a smart, talented little girl who wants to be an owl when she grows up. We are incredibly blessed in our family life. Insert hashtag here. 

The stories that I have started, gotten twenty pages in, and scrapped are innumerable. Every story that I scrapped I felt that it wasn’t “the one.” There was something missing in the narrative or I found that the story was too childish. 

I came across the story for The Clouds Aren’t White (TCAW) quite by accident. One day I found myself wondering how one would cope with the loss of a spouse when there were children involved. Its one of the most frightening things, the threat of loss.  So I began to write.

I finished the first draft of the novel in three months and finished five days before my husband’s birthday. I kept telling him that I had thousands of words left before I was finished. I gave the three hundred page manuscript to him for his birthday, then promptly took it back so I could start editing. 

I hope that you findThe Clouds Aren’t White engaging and passionate. Please leave a review on Amazon or send me an email in the ‘contact’ tab. I would love to hear from you.

Cheers,

Rachael

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